An invitation to feedback! Community review our course on open practice

Screenshot of OpenLearn Works (contains image: Alan Levine "Life is Sharing" CC-BY 2.0)

Screenshot of section 1.3 on OpenLearn Works (contains image: Alan Levine “Life is Sharing” CC-BY 2.0)

by Beck Pitt (OEPS project)

I am pleased to announce that a draft of the project’s course on open educational practices (OEP) is now available for review! In a nutshell the course aims to explore and foreground OEP in part through practical advice on the use of open educational practices (OER) whilst simultaneously highlighting examples of best practice and ideas for your own context. The course has been developed to cover the fundamentals but also provides additional material for further exploration in the Further Reading sections.

For the next three weeks (until 26 November 2015) you have the opportunity to feedback on the course and let us know whether it meets your needs, those of your institution and if not, what can be improved. We’d love to hear your thoughts!

The badged four-part course will be openly licensed, available on OpenLearn Works and will launch in January 2016.

Why community review? 

Quite simply in order to make the course better and more relevant for YOU and your colleagues. Previous experiences of this type of open peer review have been incredibly useful: receiving a certain amount of community feedback was essential for the first iteration of the OER Hub’s Open Research course to go ahead.  Being open about the course’s development (e.g. regularly blogging about the course’s development) was also important and reflected the Hub’s own open practices. We had excellent feedback from fellow facilitators and interested parties both via this channel and elsewhere which really helped to tighten up the course structure, content and delivery mechanisms.

What’s involved? 

Reviewing the course could just involve browsing the content quickly or a more detailed read… there’s no obligation to read everything! We’re interested in all types of feedback; from general impressions on what’s covered through to suggestions for additional content and corrections.

  • Does this course look useful and relevant to your and your colleagues?
  • Would you use the course material? If not, why not?
  • Is material covered in sufficient detail? Is there something missing you’d like the course to cover?

We welcome comments on this blog post, comments directly on the material (click on the header links below to go to the relevant Google doc) or even just a vote on our poll (although ideally we’d love to know why too!). I will be monitoring feedback and responding periodically during the three week review period.

So what’s in the course and how is it structured? 

Each section of the course has an accompanying reading list to enable a ‘deeper dive’ into material and each section also has an accompanying activity. These are still work in progress so haven’t been included; however, you can see a sample reading list at the end of the Course introduction and Part One document. We are also in the process of picking out good examples of best practice to include in the final version.

All the content is available below on Google docs and you can comment directly on the material. Or if you would prefer, please comment in response this blog post.

Course introduction and Part One

  • 1.1 What do we mean by “open”?
  • 1.2 Open Educational Resources?
  • 1.3 The Practice of Open Educational Resources
  • 1.4 Open Licensing

Part Two

  • 2.1 Why open educational resources (OER)?
  • 2.2 Where can I find OER?
  • 2.3 Attributing a resource
  • 2.4  The ‘open’ in open licensing

Part Three

  • 3.1 Exploring Open Practices
  • 3.2 Remixing OER
  • 3.3 Why openly license my own material?
  • 3.4 What do I need to consider when creating an OER?

Part Four

  • 4.1 What license should I choose?
  • 4.2 How can I share my resources with others?
  • 4.3 Measuring Impact
  • 4.4 What next?

What isn’t included in his draft of the course? 

As above, please note that best practice examples, some further reading sections and activities for each section are pending.

And last but not least, our course is currently lacking a punchy title! All suggestions welcome : )

Looking forward to hearing from you and thanks for your anticipated input! 

About Beck Pitt

Researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland and CEPOL projects. Based at The Open University (UK).

Posted on November 5, 2015, in Announcement, free course, Progress, Research and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Beck, thank you for opening up this course for feedback, I have learnt a great deal. As an ex 7-12 teacher and now researcher of OEP and STEM teacher professional learning I’ll be spreading the word & encouraging people to sign up. I feel teachers would benefit from learning about OER & OEP through a pedagogical perspective, for example, within the context of the maker/remix movement. I didn’t realise, until recently, they share a similar ideology. Librarians are beginning to promote a blend of both movements…here’s two examples http://www.slj.com/2015/10/technology/a-librarians-guide-to-oer-in-the-maker-space/#_ and http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/gwynethjones/secrets-of-the-remix-mashup-youtube-gen-2015?utm_source=slideshow&utm_medium=ssemail&utm_campaign=upload_digest . Teachers for some time have been using and promoting CC licensed resources but conversation don’t usually focus on OER & OEP. Beck you may already be including this in examples of practice. Looking forward to signing up in January! Cheers, Penny

  2. Hi Penny, thanks so much for your feedback and your suggestions. These look great and I’m looking forward to reviewing properly shortly. Thanks so much again for taking time out to review the course and comment, and for letting us know that you’ll be spreading the word too. We really appreciate your support! All best wishes, Beck

  1. Pingback: OUT NOW! Becoming an Open Educator open course | OEPScotland

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