Author Archives: Beck Pitt

Hot off the Press: Three new case studies are go!

We’ve published a number of interesting case studies and best practice examples over the past 6 weeks. To help keep you up-to-date, here’s a quick round up of the latest posts. Explore these and other case studies on oeps.ac.uk.

  • Collaborating to build “a city of information literacy, a city of Wikipedia” features Ewan McAndrew, Wikimedian in Residence at The University of Edinburgh. If you’re interested in finding out more about how Wikipedia ensures entries contain “fact checked information”, ideas for using Wikipedia in your teaching or are curious about what an edit-a-thon is you’ve come to the right place!
  • Find out more about how the Social Innovation Academy led by Edinburgh’s People Know How use OER to enable community focused training in partnership with a range of organisations. How did the scheme benefit participants and what’s next for this exciting collaboration?
  • Read more about how students are using Wikibooks to co-create open textbooks and critically engage with their own use of social media platforms as part of The University of Stirling’s Digital Media and Culture module led by lecturer Greg Singh in Using OER to Test Assumptions…  If you’re thinking of using open knowledge platforms in your teaching, don’t miss reading Greg’s advice!

Have you got an idea for a case study or open educational practice you want to feature? Get in touch! We’d love to hear from you. Tweet @BeckPitt and @OEPScotland or email oepscotland@gmail.com for more information.

Beck Pitt

Picture credits: 

Group brainstorm photo (People Know How: Used with Permission); Greg Singh (used with permission) and Edinburgh Gothic – Wikipedia editathon for Robert Lewis Stevenson Day 09.jpg by Mihaela Bodlovic (http://www.aliceboreasphotography.com) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Reusable Thinking About Open Workshop content out now!

As you might be aware, OEPS have conducted a large number of workshops on different facets of open practice with organisations and institutions across Scotland over the past two years. Perhaps the team has visited where you’re based or you caught taster sessions of workshops at an OEPS Forum?

As part of the OEPS commitment to openness, we’re proud to announce that the first set of reusable workshop content is now available. This content relates to the Thinking about Open workshops that myself and Bea developed and facilitated.  The workshop content is CC BY licensed and we invite you to reuse it in any way you see fit! You could facilitate a similar workshop, reuse any of the activities and content or simply review it for ideas. The choice is yours!

So what is Thinking about Open?

Thinking About Open is a half-day workshop exploring what openness and open educational practices are. The workshop aims to help instigate discussion at your organisation on how openness could make a difference to your own practices whilst acting as a springboard for further discussion on the practicalities of open practice. The workshop utilises a range of case studies and examples of openness to help facilitate discussion.

This workshop is aimed at anyone with an interest in finding out more about openness and how it can make a difference to their own practice. [REF]

Various iterations of the workshop were delivered at 7 different college and higher education institutions across Scotland, as well as as taster sessions at various OEPS forums, over the past 18 months. We received positive feedback about the workshop from participants, for example:

“The ‘Thinking about Open’ session Beck and Bea facilitated for a range of UHI colleagues was both timely and excellent. It broadened and deepened the range of ways in which we could consider and approach open educational practice, and how an open ethos could be reflected in individual and collective practice within our own institutional context. We have already begun to further explore issues and ideas introduced during the workshop, and to identity practical and strategic next steps that we can take.”

Professor Keith Smyth, University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), Inverness (November 2016)

Thank you so much to everyone who hosted and participated in a workshop!

The CC BY licensed workshop pack is comprised of four parts:

We would love to know if and how you reuse any of the workshop pack. All feedback and comments are welcome! Please get in touch or @BeckPitt / @OEPScotland 

OEPS Summer Newsletter out now!

It’s been a busy few months! To help keep you up to date with all the project’s activities and what we’ve been up to, we’ve just published our summer newsletter.

So what’s new?

Don’t delay, catch up with all the news and download your copy today!

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Photo credits: featured image is “All His” by Scottish Dream Photography and is licensed CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 

OUT NOW! Becoming an Open Educator open course

We are pleased and excited to announce that our open badged online course Becoming an Open Educator is now live on OpenLearn Works! Focussing on how free and open might change your approach to teaching and learning, the course is aimed at educators, facilitators and administrators across all sectors. The OEPS team collaboratively developed the course and the lead author was Beck Pitt. An earlier version of the course was openly peer reviewed.

During Becoming an Open Educator you will discover how to find open resources and their benefits and consider whether they change the relationship to the content you create. You’ll also reflect on your own practice and what ‘open’ might mean for your own context. Who might use any open educational resources you create and what do you need to consider to ensure your resource is visible and re-useable?

The course also explains how ‘open’ licences work in supporting open sharing and reuse and is full of lots of best practice examples of open practice and suggestions. The course includes a series of quizzes which count towards a digital badge. If you read through all the material in the course you will receive a Statement of Participation.

Head over and check out the course! If you like what you see then please don’t forget to tell your colleagues and spread the word.

If you are interested in exploring different ways you could reuse the course content with your peers, colleagues or/and students, please don’t hesitate to get in touch. We would also welcome any thoughts, comments and suggestions you have and would love to hear from you if the course has made a difference to your practice. Drop us a line (oepscotland [at] gmail.com) or tweet us and use the hashtag #openeducator when tweeting about the course.

 

Image credits: “Life is Sharing” by Alan Levine is licensed CC BY 2.0 

New! OEPS Flyer Hot off the Press

  • Want to help promote OEPS?
  • Need a succinct outline of what the project aims to achieve?
  • Looking for a printable summary of the project?

Look no further! We are pleased to announce the launch of new flyer which summarises the project, the OEPS take on open educational practices and gives an overview of some of our key outputs such as the OEPS Hub and the OER we have produced with organisations such as Parkinson’s UK and SAMS.

OEPS flyer p1
OEPS leaflet p2

The flyer is also now available via our About page.

 

University of Edinburgh: Creating Open Culture

If you’re interested in supporting and developing institutional open practice, the latest OEPS Hub case studies are for you!

Focused on the University of Edinburgh, we interviewed Melissa Highton and Stuart Nicol earlier in the year to find out more about the background to Edinburgh’s approach to open education. From taking a look at the meaning of open within the Edinburgh context to developing joined up services and policies to help staff and students become more open in their practice, these case studies are a great insight into driving forward institutional change.

Read Creating a Culture of Open: University of Edinburgh and Active Evolution: Enabling Cultural Change at Edinburgh University to find out more! 

Image credits:  Photo of Melissa used with permission. Sketchnote of Melissa’s keynote “Open with Care…” at OER16 “Melissa.Highton.OER16” by Beck Pitt and licensed CC BY 2.0.  Photo of Stuart and “Embracing Openness” image used with permission. 

New case study! Openness, blogging and the power of connection

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“I’m interested in how we can do things more in the open just so that they can benefit others”

The latest case study to be released on the OEPS Hub focuses on openness, blogging and building communities through social media. Martin Hawksey, Innovation, Community and Technology Officer for the Association for Learning Technology (ALT), kindly took time out to discuss how and why he got started blogging and offers valuable advice to those considering being more open and sharing their ideas online. Martin also reflects on some of the challenges of becoming more open in your everyday practice and reflects on the nuances of openness.

Read Martin Hawksey: openness, blogging and the power of connection.

Picture credit: Martin Hawksey by Ade Oshineye (used with permission) 

Mapping OEP in Scotland: Your Stories

Haven’t checked out the OEPS Hub in a while? Don’t miss the opportunity to browse the latest additions, including a growing number of mini-case studies of best practice across the sector, with advice and tips from people who are experimenting and developing open practices and initiatives across Scotland, as well as a variety of perspectives on openness. Case studies recently released include:

Thanks to everyone who has taken part in an interview to date; it’s been great to capture your thoughts and experiences. If you enjoyed reading these, and would like to talk with us about your own open practices and what’s happening where you are, please get in touch!  You can tweet me @BeckPitt or contact the OEPS project.

 

Photo/Picture credits (from top left): Natalie Lafferty (via Twitter), Lorna Campbell (via her blog, CC-BY 3.0), Stephanie McKendry (via her Strathclyde profile), “Open, Open, Open” (CC-BY 4.0 International, Beck Pitt), “Life is Sharing” (CC-BY 2.0, Alan Levine)

An invitation to feedback! Community review our course on open practice

Screenshot of OpenLearn Works (contains image: Alan Levine "Life is Sharing" CC-BY 2.0)

Screenshot of section 1.3 on OpenLearn Works (contains image: Alan Levine “Life is Sharing” CC-BY 2.0)

by Beck Pitt (OEPS project)

I am pleased to announce that a draft of the project’s course on open educational practices (OEP) is now available for review! In a nutshell the course aims to explore and foreground OEP in part through practical advice on the use of open educational practices (OER) whilst simultaneously highlighting examples of best practice and ideas for your own context. The course has been developed to cover the fundamentals but also provides additional material for further exploration in the Further Reading sections.

For the next three weeks (until 26 November 2015) you have the opportunity to feedback on the course and let us know whether it meets your needs, those of your institution and if not, what can be improved. We’d love to hear your thoughts!

The badged four-part course will be openly licensed, available on OpenLearn Works and will launch in January 2016.

Why community review? 

Quite simply in order to make the course better and more relevant for YOU and your colleagues. Previous experiences of this type of open peer review have been incredibly useful: receiving a certain amount of community feedback was essential for the first iteration of the OER Hub’s Open Research course to go ahead.  Being open about the course’s development (e.g. regularly blogging about the course’s development) was also important and reflected the Hub’s own open practices. We had excellent feedback from fellow facilitators and interested parties both via this channel and elsewhere which really helped to tighten up the course structure, content and delivery mechanisms.

What’s involved? 

Reviewing the course could just involve browsing the content quickly or a more detailed read… there’s no obligation to read everything! We’re interested in all types of feedback; from general impressions on what’s covered through to suggestions for additional content and corrections.

  • Does this course look useful and relevant to your and your colleagues?
  • Would you use the course material? If not, why not?
  • Is material covered in sufficient detail? Is there something missing you’d like the course to cover?

We welcome comments on this blog post, comments directly on the material (click on the header links below to go to the relevant Google doc) or even just a vote on our poll (although ideally we’d love to know why too!). I will be monitoring feedback and responding periodically during the three week review period.

So what’s in the course and how is it structured? 

Each section of the course has an accompanying reading list to enable a ‘deeper dive’ into material and each section also has an accompanying activity. These are still work in progress so haven’t been included; however, you can see a sample reading list at the end of the Course introduction and Part One document. We are also in the process of picking out good examples of best practice to include in the final version.

All the content is available below on Google docs and you can comment directly on the material. Or if you would prefer, please comment in response this blog post.

Course introduction and Part One

  • 1.1 What do we mean by “open”?
  • 1.2 Open Educational Resources?
  • 1.3 The Practice of Open Educational Resources
  • 1.4 Open Licensing

Part Two

  • 2.1 Why open educational resources (OER)?
  • 2.2 Where can I find OER?
  • 2.3 Attributing a resource
  • 2.4  The ‘open’ in open licensing

Part Three

  • 3.1 Exploring Open Practices
  • 3.2 Remixing OER
  • 3.3 Why openly license my own material?
  • 3.4 What do I need to consider when creating an OER?

Part Four

  • 4.1 What license should I choose?
  • 4.2 How can I share my resources with others?
  • 4.3 Measuring Impact
  • 4.4 What next?

What isn’t included in his draft of the course? 

As above, please note that best practice examples, some further reading sections and activities for each section are pending.

And last but not least, our course is currently lacking a punchy title! All suggestions welcome : )

Looking forward to hearing from you and thanks for your anticipated input!