Category Archives: Report

OEPS Final Report launched!

The core message of the final report from the OEPS project is that innovative practice that puts students first can ensure that open education breaks down barriers to participation in education.  The report is published today (Monday 11th September) to coincide with the ‘Promise of Open Education’ Conference at Edinburgh’s Dynamic Earth.

The report provides evidence and case studies from across the Scottish sector.  It highlights the potential of working across boundaries, an approach that enabled the OEPS project to co-create fifteen new free, open online courses with organisations like Dyslexia Scotland and Parkinson’s UK.  OEPS found a high level of interest in the use of these online courses in the informal education sector with almost half of the organisations involved coming from the third sector, trade unions or employers.

The OEPS project was concerned with developing good open educational practice that supports widening participation and social justice.  Working with organisations that support non-traditional students provided the team with valuable insights into the barriers that online learning can present.  The report links to a range of reports and guidance material designed to help educators, course designers and widening participation practitioners enable the barriers to be overcome.

The report highlights innovative practice from across the Scottish sector but suggests that more needs to be done to provide a policy framework that can embed this practice in the mainstream.  It suggests that wherever possible educational materials should be released as open by default.

The report stresses the value of institutional collaboration in the use of open educational resources and recommends that the Scottish Government and the Scottish Funding Council consider systems, support mechanisms and policies that can facilitate and sustain such partnerships.

The report is essential reading whether you’ve never heard of open education before or whether you are a seasoned open educator. We encourage everyone to read the OEPS Final Report.

 

Pete Cannell

OEPS Co-Director

 

This post is published as one of many celebrating Open Education in the run up to the OEPS final event, The Promise of Open Education at Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh on Monday 11th September. Join the conversation before, during and after the event with the hashtag#BeOpen’. We are livestreaming on the day via Periscope and there will be a Twitter chat in the afternoon using #BeOpen and @OEPScotland.

Developing business models for open, online education

In the latest addition to the OEPS collection of reports and briefings we reflect on the ways that institutions are engaging with open education.   The report considers emerging models under six broad and often interconnected categories:

  • Institutional Profile
  • Public Good
  • Knowledge Exchange
  • Curriculum Development
  • Educational Transitions and Widening Participation
  • Professional Development and Communities of Practice

The report discusses the opportunities and challenges for institutions and concludes that ‘genuinely sustainable business models will depend on combining policy and practice across a range of different areas of application.’

You can download the report here. It will be added to the OEPS Legacy Collection.

Workshop Gamestorming with Sunni Brown on June 6th 2013 in Amsterdam organized by Business Models Inc.

Workshop Gamestorming by Sebastiaan ter Burg licensed as CC BY 2.0

Is open and online reconfiguring learner journeys?

Tuesday 6th June marked the first day of the 3rd International Enhancement in Higher Education Conference held in Glasgow. The conference coincides with the final year of QAA Scotland’s ‘Transitions’ enhancement theme. At the Enhancement Themes Conference in 2016 the OEPS team explored the relevance of OER and OEP to educational transitions. This year in our presentation we focussed on the question ‘Is open and online reconfiguring learner journeys?’

We noted that learner journeys may involve transitions from informal or self-directed to formal learning, between sectors and between education and employment. These transitions are negotiated in environments where digital technology is becoming ubiquitous. Organisations that support transitions now believe that supporting the development of digital skills is essential and some are making use of open resources.   Almost all students, young and mature, now arrive in HE with some digital skills – some may have new forms of credential (open badges). These provide a platform for developing digital literacy and the skills appropriate to learning in higher education.

We raised the possibility that as a result it may be necessary to rethink the pedagogy that underpins transitions and concluded with two questions for reflection:

  • Is there a disconnect between pedagogy, practice, student needs and student experience?
  • And if there is what does this imply for supporting widening participation transitions?

et 2017ET Themes by Pete Cannell, CC BY SA 4.0

The slides for the OEPS presentation can be accessed on slideshare.net

All the presentation slides from the Enhancement Themes conference (keynote and parallel), conference papers and poster presentations are available on the Enhancement Themes website.

Pete Cannell

 

 

Sharing open practice

Foundations of Self-Directed Support course on OpenLearn

Foundations of Self-Directed Support course on OpenLearn

In September 2016 we published a post on the openly licensed, online course ‘Foundations for Self Directed Support in Scotland’. The course was commissioned by the Scottish Government and developed by the Open University in Scotland together with the Open University’s Faculty of Health and Social Care.

The evaluation report produced by the development team describes how engagement with the course was fostered through the use of workplace and community ambassadors.   The course has been successful in attracting a large number of users.  Moreover there is evidence from the evaluation that where learners were able to engage in peer interaction in the workplace levels of retention and achievement were high and had an impact on wider workplace culture.

The course team has now published an annexe to the evaluation report that provides templates for the face-to-face workshops that were used to encourage successful participation. The report and its annexe provide a valuable insight into the value of combining well designed open online courses with supportive and contextualised practice.  The annexe includes the full set of six workshop designs as a single pdf document and also as a Word file that is openly licensed and can be disaggregated, edited and reversioned.

OEPS team

Awareness of OER and OEP in Scottish Colleges – Survey Results

The Open Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) Project conducted a survey to find out about the level of awareness of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices (OEP) among college staff in Scotland. In total 236 valid responses were collected in a seven-week period from February 1st, 2016 to March 20th, 2016. The survey was distributed in 24 Colleges, and responses were obtained from 16 of them. However, most respondents came from 5 institutions, making unadvisable any conclusion that these results are necessarily representative of the sector as a whole.

Key findings

  • Awareness of open educational resources (OER) among educators in Scotland’s colleges is very low
  • Awareness of CC licenses is lower than public domain or copyright (but awareness of all license types is higher than awareness of OER in general)
  • Most educators share teaching materials via their institutions VLE but few share them openly online
  • Quality and accuracy are the most important factors influencing educators’ choice of teaching material
  • Lack of awareness and not knowing how to use OER are perceived as the highest barriers to adoption of OER
  • Staff who attend CPD opportunities are more likely to engage with OER and OEP

Recommendations

  • Efforts to raise awareness of OER and OEP among teaching staff in Scotland’s colleges need to be scaled up
  • Opportunities for development around the use of OER in the curriculum (and especially the affordances and limitations of open licenses) should be provided
  • Colleges should consider the possibility of ‘opening up’ their VLEs, and establish how to best support and encourage their teaching staff to share resources openly

The full interim report is available for download following this link. We have also shared the anonymised survey data under a CC BY license on FigShare.

The infographic below highlights some of the survey results.

Awareness of OER and OEP in Scottish HE institutions – Survey Results

The Open Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project conducted a survey to find out about the level of awareness of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices (OEP) among Higher Education (HE) institutions in Scotland. The survey was distributed in 19 HE institutions, and responses were collected in a five-week period from 19th October 2015 to 23rd November 2015.

Key findings

  • Awareness of OER among Scottish HE educators is generally low
  • Awareness of Creative Commons (CC) licenses is lower than public domain or copyright (but awareness of all license types is higher than awareness of OER in general)
  • Most educators share teaching materials via their institution’s virtual learning environment (VLE) but few share them openly online
  • Lack of awareness is perceived as the highest barrier to adoption of OER
  • Scottish HE educators use OER to broaden the range of materials available to their students
  • Staff who attend continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities are more likely to engage with OER and OEP

Recommendations

  • Efforts to raise awareness of OER and OEP among HE teaching staff in Scotland need to be scaled up
  • Opportunities for development around the use of OER in the curriculum, and especially the affordances and limitations of open licenses, should be provided
  • Institutions should consider the possibility of ‘opening up’ their VLEs, and establish how to best support and encourage their teaching staff to share resources openly

The full interim report is available for download following this link. We have also shared the anonymised survey data under a CC BY license on FigShare.

The infographic below highlights some of the survey results.

 

New report on use of free online courses published

New report published on the use of a free, online course in workplace and community settings

Screenshot Foundations for self-directed support in Scotland course (hosted on OpenLearn)

Screenshot Foundations for self-directed support in Scotland course (hosted on OpenLearn)

Evidence from a small number of free, openly licensed courses, developed by staff at the Open University in Scotland prior to the launch of the OEPS project in 2014, has played a part in how the project team has understood open educational practice in the context of life long learning.  One such course is ‘KG097 Foundations for self-directed support in Scotland’.  The course was commissioned by the Scottish Government, and launched in April 2013, to support the dissemination of knowledge and understanding of self-directed support (SDS) in Scotland.  An in depth evaluation of the way in which the course was used and the ways in which a small project team engaged with learners and potential learners has now been published.

In the OEPS project we have tried to understand the barriers to the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and to develop good practice to overcome these.  Across the Scottish sector there is significant interest in the use of openly licensed courses for professional development.  However, potential learners often assume that learning online will be individualised, isolated and ‘tick box’.  The evidence collated in this report provides valuable insights into how such fears can be overcome.

The use of SDS ‘ambassadors’ builds on practice from widening participation that shows the importance of ‘trusted intermediaries’ in encouraging individuals in workplace and community settings to begin studying.  The evidence also suggests that combined with this support, and once on course, designing the course material to support reflection in and on practice was crucial.  The report shows how workplace settings afford opportunities for social interaction.  This was encouraged by the project and by the ambassadors, and was effective in keeping learners engaged.  Importantly there is also evidence that the online course was effective in increasing knowledge and understanding and effecting changes in practice.  There is also some evidence of transfer of knowledge into the wider workplace setting.

If you are interested in effective practice in the design and use of open, online courses or in learning in workplace and community settings then this report is a valuable and timely resource.

Report on Foundations for ‘Self-Directed Support in Scotland’ open online course

Pete Cannell

 

 

 

OEPS workshops in September 2016

This month is a busy time for the project with ten workshops scheduled between now and the end of September. The majority are learning design events. Two of the design workshops involve the Equality Challenge Unit and a consortium of universities and colleges. The aim is to produce an open course for teachers that supports efforts to increase the number of young women choosing to specialise in STEM subjects. Later in the month we will meet with staff from The University of Strathclyde to work on the first stage of planning a open CPD course for pharmacists. On the theme of teacher CPD we are also facilitating a first stage design workshop for a project aimed at producing a Scots Language course.

However, the design workshops are not simply aimed at OER production. We will also be using participatory design methods to help Unite the Union and the Poverty Alliance think through student centred approaches to the curation of free online resources. In addition we are meeting with members of the Learning for Sustainability network to think through the links between open practice and the specific needs of educators in this inter-disciplinary area with a view to designing a workshop or workshops for a wider audience.

Towards the end of the month we will be running our ‘Thinking about Open’ workshop for the University of the Highlands and Islands in Inverness and the College Development Network in Stirling.

Pete Cannell

 

Making Sense of MOOCs

The Commonwealth of Learning in partnership with UNESCO has recently released ‘Making Sense of MOOCs – a guide for policy makers in developing countries’.  The COL/UNESCO partnership reflects the recognition in the recent Incheon Declaration that MOOCs can support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.  While the report is written for a developing world audience, a great deal of the content will be of interest to anyone in Scotland interested in developing free online courses.

The first two chapters are concerned with definitions and the benefits and limitations of MOOCs.  The authors describe MOOCs as a form of open education offered for free through online platforms. 
They go on to suggest that what distinguishes a MOOC from other online courses is that:

  • It is designed for, in theory, an unlimited number of participants and as such is related to the scalability of the education service provider. 

  • It is accessible at no charge. 

  • It requires no entry qualifications. 

  • All elements of the course provision are provided fully online. 


There is a useful discussion of what is understood by ‘open’ in open education.  The authors restrict their definition of Open Educational Resources (OER) to apply to materials.  So in their view MOOCs may or may not be openly licensed but if the latter it is the materials that constitute the course that form OER. Our experience with the development and use of openly licensed courses in the OEPS project suggests that this distinction is worth further discussion.

In later chapters concerned with learner centred approaches and reuse and adaptation of courses there is a very welcome focus on designing MOOCs that recognise the situated and social character of learning.  The links between this focus and Open Educational Practice (OEP), which are understood to be practices, which remove barriers to engagement, are worth teasing out further.

I’d strongly recommend a look at this report to anyone with an interest in open education.

Pete Cannell

Preliminary findings – evaluation of a pilot cohort studying Understanding Parkinson’s

Figure 1: Screenshot of a reflective exercise relating to a case study featuring video ofSteve Peat

Figure 1: Screenshot of a reflective exercise relating to a case study featuring video of Steve Peat

Understanding Parkinson’s is a free openly licensed online course developed by OEPS in partnership with Parkinson’s UK.  The course is aimed at front line health and social care staff, many of whom will be working in the residential care sector.  We are currently analysing data from an evaluation of the experience of a pilot group based in the Western Isles and distributed across a number of workplaces and community settings.

In an extended discussion of some of the preliminary findings of the evaluation, Ronald Macintyre from the OEPS team notes how combining qualitative evidence from personal experience with analytic data provides for a richer picture of the learner journey and sheds light on issues which are not accessible through analytics alone.

You can download Ronald’s discussion of the preliminary findings at:

Using Open Online Learning to Support Practice

Figure 2: Grouping and Ranking Learning Experiences: medication, the individual and family were most salient issues. Learning online receded into the background

Figure 2: Grouping and Ranking Learning Experiences: medication, the individual and family were most salient issues. Learning online receded into the background

A short case study about how Understanding Parkinson’s was created can be found on the OEPS hub at Building an OER in partnership – Understanding Parkinson’s.

You can view the video featured in figure 1 at What is the impact of Parkinson’s on people’s daily life?

Pete Cannell